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Audiology in the Classrooms – A Terminology Primer for Education

This primer will focus on terminology, abbreviations, and jargon commonly used in education. Terminology will vary across jurisdictions, but many terms are common across Canada, North America and even internationally.

Audiology in the Classrooms: Getting Students Ready for “Back to School”

Our Audiology Education column gets bumped up to feature this issue and will cover some of the skills and plans needed across the grade levels for students to have their best chance for success at school.

AUDIOLOGY IN THE CLASSROOMS

We’re please to welcome our newest columnist, Pam Millett who will give us the latest on what educational audiology is all about and how audiologists support students with hearing loss.

Fallacy of “The Teacher Voice”

This issue’s Audiology in the Classrooms is by Dr. Krista Yuskow of the Edmonton Public Schools as an educational audiologist. Of her many interests Krista focuses on the relationship between hearing loss and self-determination.

Back to School During a Pandemic (still): Lessons Learned

We have now all survived a full year of school during a pandemic – what have we learned? What lessons can we take forward into the next year of uncertainty, given that Ministries of Education across Canada have released back-to-school plans which assume in-person learning?

The Incredible Shrinking FM Receiver

It is challenging for clinical audiologists to keep track of advances in FM system technology. With parent consent, picking up the phone or sending an email to collaborate on technology choices ensures that our students have the best possible access to the world through hearing.

Non-Auditory Effects of Environmental Noise

The study of non-auditory effects of everyday environmental noise such as sleep disruptions and annoyance are not traditionally part of audiology. Most of the researchers are not audiologists, and the journals, while well-respected and peer-reviewed, are not mainstream audiology publications. This white paper is a primer for this important area of study and will also appear on the Canadian Academy of Audiology website at www.CanadianAudiology.ca.

Message from the Editor-in-Chief

Non-auditory Effects of Lower-Level Environmental Noise This issue of CanadianAudiologist.ca is about audiology and also not about audiology. The topic of how lower levels of environmental noise affect the body has been formally studied since 1946, yet has not shown anything definitive about long-term effects related to sleep disruption, annoyance, or overall stress. The following…

Patient-Provider Healthcare Communication in the Hospital Setting

The purpose of this quality improvement study was to proactively address communication barriers imposed by hearing loss in a hospital setting using Wi-Fi-based wireless smartphone technology during patient-provider face-to-face encounters.

Severe to Profound Hearing Loss from the other side of the Otoscope

An Interview with Peter Stelmacovich of Phonak Canada
In a recent interview, Phonak’s Peter Stelmacovich shared some of his experiences as a consumer and an Audiologist, with regard to living with a severe to profound hearing loss.